Burlington Free Press Aug 2014 | Silence guards Freeh condition at Dartmouth Hospital

Former FBI director Louis Freeh remained hospitalized at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center on Wednesday, two days after he crashed his SUV in southern Vermont.

Freeh, 64, of Wilmington, Del., was admitted under armed guard to the intensive care unit of the Lebanon, N.H., hospital following the 12:15 p.m crash Monday on Vermont 12 in Barnard.

The bureau put the armed protection in place due to Freeh’s past work on terrorism while serving as FBI director from 1993 to 2001, the authorities said.

The special protection was established by the FBI in cooperation with New Hampshire State Police.

The Vermont State Police initially said Freeh was seriously injured in the crash. The agency said Wednesday there is no indication Freeh’s car was tampered with. The cause of the crash remains under investigation. The police did say there is no evidence that drugs or alcohol were a factor in the wreck.

Because of the nature of the single-car crash, the state police accident reconstruction team was not called in, said Lt. William Jenkins, station commander at the Royalton barracks.

An unidentified FBI agent, believed to be off-duty, happened to be among the first people at the crash scene, police said.

FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C. said it had nothing new to add to the one-sentence statement issued Monday evening. A spokeswoman said calls were being directed to the FBI Boston office.

Representatives of the FBI in Boston refused Wednesday to transfer phone calls to Special Agent Vincent Lisi, who supervises four New England states, or any of his five assistant special agents in charge.

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The National Interest Aug 2014 | Beware of the MEK

The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Based on news reports, a number of U.S. officials and former officials have adopted this motto in recent months. They seem to believe the prospect of the nuclear issue being solved and rapprochement with Tehran so threatening that they have rushed to Iran’s great foe: the People’s Mojahdein Organization (MEK).

The MEK is a cult-like dissident group, based outside of Iran, primarily in Iraq and France for much of the past three decades. It was considered a terrorist group by the United States until 2012 and by the European Union until 2009, when it was removed from the list of terrorist organizations and became increasingly viewed as an alternative to Iran’s current regime. This shows that the MEK’s campaign to galvanize support in the West has been relatively successful.

Read more about the group supported by Louis Freeh

Frontline April 2009 | Extended Interview With Louis Freeh Former FBI Director, now attorney to Prince Bandar

As the head of his own global consulting firm, Freeh Group International, Louis Freeh has been hired by Prince Bandar as his legal representative on issues surrounding the Al-Yamamah arms deal. Lowell Bergman interviewed Louis Freeh on March 19, 2009 about allegations — that Freeh insists are untrue — that his client received approximately $2 billion and a wide-body Airbus 340 from arms company BAE Systems as part of the massive arms contract. Freeh finally agreed to be interviewed just weeks before our airdate, following months of requests by FRONTLINE for interviews with both Freeh and Prince Bandar.

Freeh was interviewed for the FRONTLINE film Black Money, which details the allegations of bribery leveled at BAE Systems and the Prince. This video contains extended excerpts of Bergman’s interview with Freeh — the first time anyone has spoken publicly on behalf of Prince Bandar about these allegations. Throughout this interview, there are markers referring to the footnotes below, which provide added context and corrections.

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